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NC Department of Health and Human Services
 
 

Walk-in hepatitis testing clinics set up at Scotland County health department for cardiology office’s patients

Release Date: September 15, 2008
Contact: Carol Schriber, 919-733-9190

RALEIGH – The Scotland County Health Department, working in partnership with the N.C. Division of Public Health, has set up three open walk-in clinics offering free blood tests to patients who had cardiac stress tests at Scotland Cardiology in Laurinburg, Scotland County, within the last 14 months. Those patients may have been exposed to hepatitis C or other blood-borne illnesses during these procedures.

The walk-in blood-testing clinics will be offered for those who have not yet been tested on Wednesday, Sept. 17; Thursday, Sept. 18; and Friday, Sept. 19 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the county health department, located at 1405 West Boulevard in Laurinburg. All patients who had stress tests performed at Scotland Cardiology between June 25, 2007 and August 26, 2008 qualify for the free clinics.

Testing is being recommended to the cardiology practice’s patients who underwent cardiac stress tests there on or after June 25, 2007, after an investigation detected seven patients with positive tests for hepatitis C. The cardiology practice is no longer performing the stress tests.
Free blood tests for affected patients also continue to be available at Scotland Memorial Hospital, at Scotland County Helath Department, and other area local health departments by appointment.

Hepatitis C is an infection of the liver caused by the hepatitis C virus. Most people do not have symptoms when they become infected. Symptoms of acute infection can include fever, nausea, tiredness, abdominal pain, and skin or eyes becoming yellow.  While some people can fight off the infection, in others it can lead to serious long-term liver damage. Hepatitis C can be treated, although the success of treatment depends on the particular strain of the virus.

 

 

 

  

 

Updated: October 14, 2008