Skip all navigation Skip to page navigation
 
 
NC Division of Medical Assistance - High quality health care through Medicaid and Health Choice for Children.

Video Transcripts

Video Library

Video Library

Transcript: State Employees Combined Campaign

HI.  I’M LINDA CARLISLE, SECRETARY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF CULTURAL RESOURCES, BUT TODAY I WANT TO TALK TO YOU AS CHAIR OF THE STATE EMPLOYEES COMBINED CAMPAIGN.  I HOPE MANY OF YOU ARE FAMILIAR WITH THIS CAMPAIGN AND HAVE BEEN CONTRIBUTORS IN THE PAST.  FOR THOSE OF YOU THAT ARE NEW, I’D LIKE TO SHARE WITH YOU JUST HOW IMPORTANT THE STATE EMPLOYEES COMBINED CAMPAIGN IS.  FOR OVER 25 YEARS, STATE EMPLOYEES HAVE BEEN GIVING TO ORGANIZATIONS THAT THEY CARE ABOUT IN THEIR COMMUNITIES ALL ACROSS NORTH CAROLINA.  WE HAVE OVER A THOUSAND ORGANIZATIONS – NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS THAT HAVE BEEN REVIEWED BY A COMMITTEE OF VOLUNTEER STATE EMPLOYEES TO ENSURE THAT THOSE ORGANIZATIONS MEET THE HIGHEST STANDARDS.  THEY WILL ONLY RECEIVE A CONTRIBUTION IF YOU DECIDE THAT THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO YOU AND THAT YOU WANT TO GIVE. 

SUPPORTING NONPROFITS MEANS THAT YOU WILL CONTINUE TO HAVE AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAMS, YOU WILL HAVE SENIOR CITIZENS WHO WILL BE ABLE TO HAVE THEIR MEALS ON WHEELS PROGRAMS TO COME OUT TO THEIR HOMES, AND THOSE MAY BE THE ONLY PROGRAMS THAT GIVE THEM THEIR SMALL PERSONAL CONTACT EACH DAY.

I WORK WITH THRESHOLD.  WE ARE A PSYCHO-SOCIAL REHABILITATION PROGRAM LOCATED IN DURHAM.  WE SERVE INDIVIDUALS WITH SEVERE AND PERSISTENT MENTAL ILLNESS.

MY NAME IS LAURA-NELL PARNELL AND I’M A DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST AT GIRL SCOUTS HORNETS NEST COUNCIL.  AT GIRL SCOUTS, WE ARE BUILDING GIRLS OF COURAGE, CONFIDENCE AND CHARACTER.  IN SHORT, WE ARE BUILDING LEADERS OF TOMORROW.

I’M AN ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER FOR SPECIAL OLYMPICS OF NORTH CAROLINA AND SPECIAL OLYMPICS NORTH CAROLINA SUPPORTS MORE THAN THIRTY-EIGHT THOUSAND ATHLETES ACROSS THE STATE OF ALL AGES WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES AND IT GIVES THEM OPPORTUNITIES TO COMPETE IN SPORTING EVENTS AND TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES ACROSS THE STATE.

MY NAME IS MARY KATE KEITH AND I’M WITH MEALS ON WHEELS OF WAKE COUNTY.  WE SERVE FIFTEEN HUNDRED SENIORS EVERY WEEKDAY WITH A HOT NUTRITIOUS LUNCH.  THESE LUNCHES ARE SERVED BY A VOLUNTEER WORKFORCE OF OVER TWO THOUSAND VOLUNTEERS WHO HELP SERVE MEALS TO THESE SENIOR NEIGHBORS.

MY NAME IS CYNTHIA SATTERFIELD.  I WORK FOR THE TAR RIVER LAND CONSERVANCY AS THEIR DEVELOPMENT AND OUTREACH PERSON.  OUR ORGANIZATION PROTECTS WATER, LAND AND AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES.

I’M VERY PROUD OF HOSPICE AND WHAT THEY DO AND HOW THEY DO IT, SO I ENJOY TELLING PEOPLE ABOUT IT.

THESE AGENCIES ARE WORKING HARD FOR FUNDIN TO HELP INDIVIDUALS THAT OTHERWISE WOULD NOT HAVE MONIES OR FUNDS FOR THEIR ORGANIZATIONS.  IT IS A WELL-NEEDED THING THAT OUR STATE IS DOING THIS FOR US.  STATE EMPLOYEES ARE CHIPPING-IN AND HELPING OUT AND MAKING IT A WONDERFUL EVENT TODAY.

I’M A STATE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEMBER FOR THE STATE EMPLOYEES COMBINED CAMPAIGN AND PRIOR TO BECOMING A STATE EMPLOYEE, I WAS A FUNDRAISER FOR RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE CHARITIES AND UNDERSTAND THE IMPORTANCE OF SUPPORTING THE CAMPAIGN AND SUPPORTING PEOPLE WHO ARE IN NEED IN NORTH  CAROLINA.

I’VE BEEN INVOLVES WITH THE STATE EMPLOYEES COMBINED CAMPAIGN FOR REALLY THE ENTIRE TIME IT HAS BEEN IN EXISTENCE, WHICH IS 24 YEARS.  THE SECC HAS CONTRIBUTED SEVENTY EIGHT MILLION DOLLARS IN THE LAST 24 YEARS OF EXISTENCE AND THAT IS FANTASTIC.  I CAN ASSURE YOU WORKING IN THE PUBLIC, AND FORMERLY IN THE PRIVATE SECTOR, HOW MUCH THE PRIVATE NONPROFITS DEPEND UPON THE HELP.

IF THERE IS ANYONE WHO HAS NOT COMMITTED TO THE COMBINED CAMPAIGN, LET THIS BE THE YEAR THAT YOU DO IT!  STATE EMPLOYEES ALL ACROSS THE STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN PEOPLE’S LIVES EVERY DAY.

AS YOU LOOK THROUGH THE CAMPAIGN GIVING GUIDE, FIND THE ORGANIZATIONS THAT YOU ARE MOST INTERESTED IN SUPPORTING, MARK THEM ON YOUR PLEDGE CARD, SIGN-UP FOR PAYROLL DEDUCTION, AND JOIN ME, BECAUSE WE KNOW THAT - TOGETHER WE MAKE THE DIFFERENCE.  THANK YOU.

Transcript: Gov. Bev Perdue Speaks to State Employees

My fellow State Employees, if you are able to take a break this summer, you deserved it. You know first hand what a difficult year we had.

I can’t thank you enough for your determination to continue delivering the very best work possible for the people of North Carolina.

Summer is fading, and as we move into the fall we face another year of tough challenges; on top of the last couple of tough years.

This global economic downturn has forced sacrifices by all of us; our neighbors, and our local and state governments.

The new normal in this very slow period of economic recovery actually has caused us all--families, businesses, and governments--to downsize, or reinvent, or actually streamline how we live, work and play.

Regardless of our challenges though, our most important asset is our people. We will meet all the challenges head-on and will do that together.

I continue to need your help in figuring out ways to save money to do our jobs better, and to provide essential services more efficiently.

More than in any time I can remember, we all need to come together and collaborate, and innovate. I understand you might feel at times that your work as state employees is under appreciated it. You know the angry phone call, or the negative blog posting, but you are the state’s largest work force. Stop for a minute. Remind yourself how important the work you do is. You are the engine, or in this date of age, you are the super charged computer processor. You make things work. That makes the difference for many of our fellow citizens every single day.

I, for one, never forget that. We are colleagues. We are friends. We have slogged through the hard times before leaning on each other. And we will continue to do this until the economic recovery is complete.

Let me hear from you please, on Twitter, or Facebook, or email. I rely on you; on your friendship, and your advice.

Have a great fall, thank you so much.

Transcript: Secretary Cansler Addresses DHHS Employees on DHHS Excels

(video link)

Hello, I’m Lanier Cansler, Secretary of DHHS. I want to thank each of you for your excitement to learn more about DHHS Excels, it is a very important effort to prepare DHHS to meet the challenges of our rapidly changing state.

At DHHS we touch the lives of every person living in North Carolina, from the youngest child to the oldest senior, from general public health information to nutrition to long term care. The responsibility with which we are tasked…and the vision for the department, is that all North Carolinians will enjoy optimal health and well-being. A simple sentence but it is not a simple task and particularly facing tough budget times and growing needs.

But we are excited about achieving this vision. At DHHS we have a tremendous work force of dedicated, hard-working employees. Every one of you is an important part of the bigger picture. And when we work together, tearing down the old divisional silos and really working as a team, I know that there is no goal that we can’t accomplish.

I’m asking each of you to embrace the vision for DHHS. Use it in your specific work site, incorporate the values and goals into your day-to-day business.   Collaborate on ways we can better do business. Be a real part of building a strong and well organized DHHS team.

We must realize that our jobs are all interconnected, and the work we do affects the greater outcomes of all those we serve.  We can no longer treat ‘parts’ of people. We must be a team, all across DHHS, that anticipates and collaborates to address the whole person.

I have confidence in our abilities to provide the best services available to the citizens of our state. I know that we can truly make North Carolina a place where its citizens will enjoy the best health and well-being of any state in the U.S.

Thank you for your interest in DHHS Excels.  I look forward to working with each of you to accomplish the goals we’ve set and the plans we have for this department and our state of North Carolina.

Transcript: Don't Stand for Elder Abuse

(video link)

Hello, I’m Lanier Cansler, Secretary of the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. I’d like to share with you why June 15th World Elder Abuse Awareness day is so important and how we can help North Carolinians become more aware of this growing problem.

Each year, in the United States, more than two million vulnerable and older adults fall prey to abuse.

Research shows that older adults who are abused, neglected and exploited are three times more likely to die within 10 years than those who are not victims.

Elder abuse affects men and women of all ethnic backgrounds and social status; it occurs in private residences and in facilities; it is greatly underreported because those who are being abused find it difficult to tell anyone due to shame and fear.

We’re encouraging you to help. In 2009 there were more than 17,000 reports of abuse, neglect or exploitation made to county departments of social services in North Carolina. These reports came from doctors, other professionals, family members and concerned citizens like you.

85% of abuse among vulnerable and older adults in North Carolina happens to people over age 59, who are living alone or with family members. The remaining 15 % happens in facilities or shelters.

The most common form of mistreatment is neglect. And more than two-thirds involve people who were unable to care for themselves adequately.

It is important to note, North Carolina is a mandatory reporting state. This means ANYONE who believes an adult with a disability is being abused, neglected or exploited is required by law to report the situation to the local county Department of Social Services.

This aspect of the law may seem intimidating to some – and may prompt some to ask themselves, “ what if the adult finds out I made the report? What if I am wrong? Will I be sued?”

These concerns maybe real, but there is built in protection. The names of individuals making an adult protective services report are not released, unless required by court order. Regarding liability, the statute does not place any burden of proof on the person who makes the report. Once a situation is reported to the county department of social services, the professionals there will evaluate the information to determine if mistreatment is present.

Let me tell you a few of the ways to recognize elder abuse. Some of the signs may include bruises, burns, cuts, scratches, malnutrition, untreated medical conditions, unsafe or unsanitary housing, mental anguish and distress, mistrust toward others, mismanaged property or savings, an inability to provide needed care.

Here are some of the things that you can do to help raise awareness about elder abuse. Don’t ignore this problem. It’s not going away. Report suspected abuse, neglect or exploitation to the adult protective services intake unit at the county department of social services where the adult lives. Volunteer in local programs that provide assistance and support for vulnerable and older adults in your community and at long-term care facilities. Educate yourself, family and community about elder abuse by visiting our website. www.ncdhhs.gov/aging/

You can do your part by helping spread the word to your friends, family and communities that we don’t stand for elder abuse in North Carolina.

Transcript: Don't Catch the Flu Bug

video link

FLUBUG : Alright it's party time!

FLUBUG: I am such a babe magnet.

FLUBUG: This place is hoppin!

ANNOUNCER: Don't let the flu bug get to you! Stop the spread by covering your cough, washing your hands often, staying home when you're sick and avoiding close contact with others who are sick.

A message from the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services and the Division of Public Health.

Transcript: N.C. Governor Bev Perdue Gets her Flu Shot

video link

I got my seasonal flu vaccine, did you?

Prevention is the first line of defense.

You know it's that time of year again. But you can protect yourself and others from the flu with a few simple steps.

Always cover your sneeze with a tissue and throw it away.

Or cough into your upper arm or your elbow, never your hands.

And please wash your hands well and often.

Let's keep North Carolina healthy and prevent the spread of the flu.

Transcript: N.C. Governor Bev Perdue Provides Flu Prevention Tips

video link

My days, just as yours, are filled with constant contact with so many different people.... shaking hands, touching doorknobs and thousands of other surfaces.

To help prevent the spread of germs and viruses, we all have to take precaution.

Always cover your sneeze with a tissue and throw it away. Cough into your upper arm or your elbow, never your hands.

And wash your hands well and often.

Let's all keep North Carolina healthy and prevent the spread of the flu.

Transcript: State Health Director Engel Discusses H1N1 Flu

video link

Hello, I’m Dr Jeff Engel, North Carolina’s State Health Director. I’m here to talk to you today about H1N1 influenza, or flu, the novel influenza virus that is responsible for the current pandemic.

In the early summer, the WHO, the World Health Organization, declared a pandemic caused by this new strain of Type A influenza virus that we call H1N1.

Already by mid-June, North Carolina state had reported 100 cases. But this likely represents only the tip of the iceberg. It is likely that thousands have been infected. Fortunately the disease is mild and most people do not see the doctor. Therefore these are the cases that we do not know about and cannot count. But of those that have been tested, we have over 100 cases in North Carolina so far.

It looks like this virus is going to be with us through the summertime and into the next flu season. I’d like to use this opportunity to tell you again and remind you that during the summertime when we don’t usually expect it , flu will be here with us in North Carolina.

We know that the H1N1 flu virus is very easily spread from person to person, and we know how it is spread. It is spread by the  cough or sneeze that comes out of our nose or mouth, and on our hands. This is known as the droplet transmission or direct contact transmission through our hands. So the way to prevent spread is really easy. When you think about that. So if you have the sickness of flu you want to cover your nose and mouth when coughing or sneezing into a tissue. You want to throw that tissue away promptly, and wash your hands as soon as possible after that. You also want to, just in general, wash your hands frequently in the daytime whether or not you’re sick, which is always a good health practice.

Remember that the symptoms of flu are cough, sneeze, sore throat, and usually a fever greater than 100 degrees with headache, muscle aches, and sometimes stomach ache and diarrhea.

You should see your doctor if these symptoms become severe. Things such as severe headache, chest pain, shortness of breath, a cough that won’t go away, these are worrisome symptoms that mean that you should see your doctor.

Young children can become dehydrated easily with nausea, and vomitting and diarrhea from stomach aches, and if that happens, and they can’t keep fluids down, that would be another reason to see your doctor.

Doctors have medications that they can prescribe for this flu, which is good news, and we hope to have a vaccine available in the coming months, hopefully as early as October or November, so stay tuned for that as well

So again a reminder that H1N1 flu is here, it’s going to be here during the summer and there are some simple things that you can do to protect yourself. Wash your hands frequently, cover your cough and sneeze with tissue, and, when you’re sick, stay home from work or school.

Thank you very much and have a very safe summer. 

Transcript: Kasey Kahne Tells You to Eat Smart, Move More

video link

On race day, both fans and drivers get a lot of seat time, but staying idle too long can hurt your performance. I’m Kasey Khane asking you to make healthy decisions. Take a walk, play with your kids. Or take the stairs. Any activity will give you an edge. You’ve got a choice – get moving. Eat smart move more North Carolina.

Transcript: Kasey Kahne Reminds you to Drink Water, Not Sugary Drinks

video link

Everything moves fast in racing. But when we’re thirst and in a hurry, we don’t cut corners on re-fueling. I’m Kasey Khane asking you to make healthy decisions. Pass on the sugary stuff.  Refuel with water instead. You’ve got a choice – re-think your drink. Eat Smart Move More North Carolina.

Transcript: Safe Surrender: It's in your Hands

Video link

North Carolina’s Safe Surrender Law could save a life. It allows an overwhelmed parent to surrender a newborn to any responsible adult. Could you be that responsible adult? Help keep babies safe. Learn more, spread the word. Safe Surrender. It’s in your hands. www.safesurrender.net . 1-800-FOR-BABY. No Shame, No Blame.

Transcript, N.C. Rehabilitation Center for the Blind

video link

“Live more independently.” “On their own independently.” “Being independent.” “I had to be independent.” “Without having to be dependent on somebody.” “To live on my own.” “For daily living.” “It feels like freedom!” “Able to leave my apartment.” “To be able to take care of yourself” “Remaining independent” “It’s about being independent”

Independence-- it’s a natural urge for everyone... regardless of age, experience or ability. We all crave it-- expect it-- and demand it.

At the North Carolina Rehabilitation Center for the Blind, consumers are empowered with the tools and resources to master their independence, regain confidence in their abilities and to reach their goals of employment.

The most important aspect of the center is we help people with vision loss to adjust to vision loss and to get their lives back on track.

"My experience with losing my vision took place 15 years ago and it took a while before I was able to come to the realization that this wasn’t going to go away. My vision was not going to miraculously come back. I had to face the fact that it was gone and I had to get on with my life and find out how to do that through the Center for the Blind. And I started attending classes there. So I went back to school and got my degree and started working as a rehabilitation counselor. And was able to work my way up the ladder to the job I have now as Assistant Director. I enjoy what I do. I feel like I’m contributing back to helping all of the people who helped me when I lost my vision and that is a very good feeling. That gets me here every day and helps me when I see how our center is helping folks who are in the same situation I was in 15 years ago."

Located on the campus of the Governor Morehead School for the Blind in Raleigh, North Carolina-- the center was the first civilian center for the blind in the United States.

The Rehabilitation Center offers a variety of services and connections for adolescents and adults who are blind or visually impaired. The programs vary by length of stay and concentration according to each consumer’s independent living and employment goals.

For people who are blind or visually impaired, just getting around safely can be a challenge. The center offers several customized training sessions on orientation and mobility.

Orientation is the process of using information gained through the senses to understand one’s position in the environment. Hearing, sight, touch, smell, and sometimes taste can help a visually impaired person understand where she is.

It has meant the world to me. It's great. It takes a lot of fear away from you. It makes you feel a little bit more comfortable, the things that you do. Like he says you have to be cautious. You just can't take off without knowing what to look for and I didn't that's the reason I fell a lot, I guess. I didn't know what to look for.

Mobility is the process of physically moving through the environment to get from Point A to Point B. Instructors help teach the visually impaired several travel techniques, such as sighted guide, cane skills and street crossing techniques in a variety of settings.

“Mobility here at the school has probably been one of the most exciting courses I've taken. I went to visit my grandchildren not long ago. Just the three of us went for a walk and they wanted to cross a busy intersection and I was scared to death, I was petrified. So, Ken has been taking me through learning how to cross busy intersections in downtown Raleigh and this morning was exciting because this was the first time I really crossed a busy intersection since I've had blindness problems. It was wonderful... It was exciting, it was thrilling, I loved it!... The reason I jumped up and down is because that I know I can do that now.”

Braille is an important reading and writing medium for people who are blind and visually impaired. Learning braille enables a person to continue to enjoy reading,
maintain records, communicate with others and gain employement.

In the Techniques of Daily Living class, each person is given hands-on instruction in personal and home management skills.

An  instructor provides adaptive techniques for setting washers and dryers using tactual marks in Braille. The instructor also introductes proper adaptive techniques for housekeeping, including dusting and cleaning flat surfaces and many other household chores.

“My self confidence has gone very very  high. I come here, I feel at ease. The staff members are the ones to help us feel at ease. I've been able to come constantly day after day with a new look that I'm going to learn and there's no stress with it. It just comes naturally coming here as far as getting support from any teacher that you need to get support from. “

Likewise, consumers who come to the center also learn adaptive cooking techniques for the visually impaired, ideas for food preparation, kitchen safety, cooking with ranges, ovens, electric grills, fryers, slow cookers and microwaves.

“I guess the biggest thing it teaches them is that it's possible to do things that they thought they could never do before. Training is the key. Proper taining gives them the tools they need to exceed. It helps to build confidence in their ability to succeed.”

Consumers who attend the center have a wide range of vision. Low vision therapists help determine specific magnification levels and offer training in the use of reading stands, glasses and magnifiers to address the individual’s independent living and employment needs.

“It's a nice place where you'll learn a lot of great stuff to use in the real world. They can really help you figure out what you need and how to deal with your eyesight problems.”

The center offers demonstration and evaluation of technology for consumers, educators and employers.

“I have people say to me, 'it's not that I cannot get somebody to read to me, but they read what they want me to hear. So it gives you back some privacy and some independence in doing your reading when you want to do it. “

CCTV or Closed captioning television technology helps people with low vision read, write and do other close-up activities by providing the right magnification necessary for each individual.

Whether it’s reading a book or a magazine, signing your name, writing checks or letters, these magnifiers can help.

“It's been a wonderful experience to be here. This is the first place I've been to begin to get the answers that I need so I can live at home, alone and take care of myself.”

“You are coming here to learn how to function within your daily living, you will learn a whole lot of things … things that you would have thought that you would never be able to do.”

In today’s world, computers provide another means for clients to reach their goals of independence and employment. The rehabilitation center offers several classes for clients to learn keyboarding, word processing, internet and e-mail skills.

They also learn to use speech support adaptive software, such as screen magnifiers and readers.

Computer labs allow people to develop resumes, career preparation and exploration. They also are available for other activities during clients’ leisure time.

“Everything I have learned here, I have put it to use. Keyboarding, the things they teach you with keyboarding, Braille, that has really helped out a lot. I could continue to read, and cooking, career-all the aspects has helped me out tremendously. Again, it's about being independent. It shows you that you can do things even though you may be visually impaired.”

Each summer, the center provides teens with visual impairments many challenging vocational and internship opportunities.

“Honestly, it's just different and amazing and like I said, just being here was so great and the best thing that I could have done. As far as my life right now especially being a senior in high school.”

“It prepares me for a life ahead, so I gain knowledge and experience that I think I'm ready for the workforce.”

“The job I had was auto detail-it was at 1915 Blue Ridge Road-North Carolina Motor Pool.”

“I worked in manufacturing area, office area, doing office workd ealing with spreadsheets, database consumer database, working with tapes and answering phones and stuff. I found out I did the work right. You never know until you try.”

“I loved my experience. I love working with children-it was the best time that I could ever have. And the best job I could ever have, too... My lifetime goal is to be a 5th grade teacher. I think working with kids-I totally enjoy it and love it. When I was interviewed to be in this work program, they asked  me to describe myself and I said working with kids was the best thing. When they chose this job, I was absolutely thrilled. I was very, very pleased with the outcome and rewards.”

“As a parent, I am very happy with the program. I appreciate the fact that after High School graduation, Josephine was involved in and engaged in something very meaningful and she had a very productive summer, which I think is going to prepare her for later in life.”

There are other types of training available like, greenhouse studies, plant propagation, and the growing and caring of plants. These skills can be used for pleasure and for employment.”

“Started to come up here and learned some horticulture and I got the opportunity to take the pesticide license test and get my pesticide license to spray pesticides and I got it.”

The dorms are equipped with suites. there's usually 3-4 to a suite with a bathroom. We have lounges with TVs and comfortable seating. We have elevators in both buildings. The rec area is in the basement. We have vending equipment in the dorm, and an ice machine. And the laundry facilities are here. We also have computer labs in both  building the students can utilize.

Also in the student rooms, we have computer ports.

In addition to all the practical skills, the Rehab Center also offers its consumers with a variety of off-campus recreational opportunities within the Triangle community-- like visits to local museums, and exhibits. Sometimes the consumers even get to go rock climbing!

“It was good, it was kind of scary, at first when you get up there. You're like oh, I don't know if I can do it or not. But once you get on the wall, and get used to it, then yeah it's fun.”

“It was my first experience, but I watched others do it, so I was able to manage to knock it out in 50 seconds.”

The Rehab Center changes lives.

“I can't say enough about being a lot more independent. Not having to rely on your family and friends.”

Are you ready to take that first step?

“Try it, try it, you'll love it. Absolutely love it.”

Are you up for the challenge?

“I feel confident that I can do anything I put my mind to.”

Are you ready for the thrill of accomplishment?

“It was awesome.”

Are you ready to put your fears aside?

“This total environment is visually impaired friendly and you don't feel like you're old and in the way. That part of the experience has been uplifting and a positive experience.”

Are you ready to change your life?

“It's just been a wonderful experience here. I'm ready to go out and spread the word and tell other people in my area just how helpful this has been to me.”

Come to the NC Rehabilitation Center for the Blind. Find out what we have to offer.

“This place really cares, and that's real talk.”

 

Transcript: Meningococcal Meningitis--Protect Yourself

video link

Meningococcal meningitis strikes 3,000 people annually.

Flu-like symptoms can develop in 2 hours.

Contracted in college environments from sharing drinks utensils and kissing.

Amputations, brain damage, loss of sight and hearing even death can occur within 2 days.

Protect yourself with a simple vaccine.

Call your doctor and get vaccinated now.

This message brought to you by the Department of Health and Human Services.

Transcript: Physicians Test Patients for HIV

video link

Doctor 1: It’s time for your patients routine physical.

Doctor 2: You check the usual.

Doctor 3: Eye, heart, BP, cholesterol, HIV.

Doctor 1: Yes HIV!

Doctor 2: 30,000 North Carolinians are living with HIV.

Doctor 3: And 2000 new cases are reported each year.

Doctor 1: So you want to check. Patients who are pregnant should definitely be tested.

Doctor 2: As physicians we do our best to save lives.

Doctor 3: Encouraging the HIV test as part of a routine physical.

Doctor 1: It’s not just good practice ...

Doctor 2: It may save a life.

Transcript: Two Barflies meet in a Smokey Bar Learn about Second-Hand Smoke

video link

Barfly1: Need a mint.

Barfly 2: Yeah.

Barfly 1: Hey, did you hear about Edna?

Barfly 2: Windshield?

Barfly 1: Heart attack!

Barfly 2: You're kidding.

Barfly 1: Yeah, all that smoking.

Barfly 2: She smoked?

Barfly 1: Well, second-hand.

Barfly 2: Oh come on! It can't be as bad as all that. [coughs]

Barfly 1: Yeah! Did you hear about Ralph?

Barfly 2: You mean it wasn't the bug spray?

Barfly 1: No, his ticker! Pfft!

Barfly 2: You know man, maybe we ought to get out of here.

Barfly 1: Yeah, before we drop like ....

Voiceover: Just 30 minutes inhaling second-hand smoke can lead to a heart attack. Get the facts at startwithyourheart.com

Transcript: Blood Pressure--Learn About It

video link

Nurse: Okay Mr. Davis, your blood pressure is (blah blah blah).

Voiceover: Do you understand what your blood pressure numbers mean?

Nurse: Blah blah blah.

Voiceover: Or are they just gibberish?

Voiceover: High blood pressure increases your chance of heart attack, stroke, and kidney failure. So next time you get checked, ask about it.

Mr. Davis: Hold it. What does that mean?

Nurse: It means your blood pressure is 120 over 80, which is normal.

Voiceover: To learn more, go to startwithyourheart.com

Transcript: Game Show: Who to Call if You have Signs of a Stroke

video link

HOST: Name someone you would call if you thought you were having a stroke.

MAN: My mom.

HOST: Show me Mom!

[EEEEEEE SIGNALING WRONG ANSWER]

HOST: Who should you call if you were having a stroke?

WOMAN: 911.

HOST: Show me 911! 

Turns and reveals:  CALL 911. They explode in a cheer!!

CROWD CHEERS

Voiceover: When you know all five signs of a stroke and call 911 - everyone wins.

Symptoms of stroke:

  • Sudden numbness of face, arm or leg
  • Sudden trouble speaking
  • Sudden trouble seeing
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness
  • Sudden severe headache

If you have any of these, call 911

Transcript: Game Show--Signs of a Stroke

video link

HOST: You’ve got three signs. Only two more: Name a sign that you could be having a stroke?

WOMAN: Sudden SEVERE headache.

HOST: Show me sudden SEVERE headache!

HOST: For the win… a sign of a stroke?

MAN: Sudden trouble seeing.

HOST: Is there – sudden trouble seeing?

CROWD CHEERS

Voiceover: When you know all five signs of a stroke and call 911 - everyone wins.

Signs of a stroke include:

  • Sudden numbness of face, arm or leg
  • Sudden trouble speaking
  • Sudden trouble seeing
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness
  • Sudden severe headache
  • call 911

 

 

State of North Carolina Home Page